The Paw Print

The Absurdity of AP Summer Assignments by Taylor Epstein

The Absurdity of AP Summer Assignments by Taylor Epstein

February 20, 2016


Filed under Opinion

Does anyone enjoy spending vacation time completing projects and immense amounts of homework? Does anyone enjoy missing out on parties, on visiting relatives, and going on vacation to do busywork, that, for the most part, is never even looked at or graded? Does anyone actually retain all or any of the information “learned” from summer assignments, or is it rushed to completion because you are not allowed out until it is done?

Whitman Speaks Out

Whitman Speaks Out

February 20, 2016


Filed under Opinion, Showcase

Summer assignments are often bemoaned by students as unnecessarily laborious and detracting from a much-needed two months of relaxation. This year's task for AP Language students, however, was designed to tackle the reason why most students dread these assignments in the first place. Juniors were tasked...

The Stark Anti-Social Nature of Social Media by Victoria Thurer

The Stark Anti-Social Nature of Social Media by Victoria Thurer

Victoria Thurer

February 20, 2016


Filed under Opinion

Do you ever take breaks while doing your homework? Do you use your phone during these breaks and find yourself opening several different social media apps? Amongst those apps, do you ever find yourself just scrolling through some nice photos, until all of a sudden you look up to check the time and it’s been a half hour or more? Now, I know this applies to more than 75 percent of the people in this room alone. Just think about how many people it affects in this school altogether. Let that sink in.

The Business of Language and the Lack Thereof by Alexis Cummings

The Business of Language and the Lack Thereof by Alexis Cummings

Alexis Cummings

February 20, 2016


Filed under Opinion

You have a 4.0, they have a 3.1. You were the president of all the Honor Societies, they participated in one club. You won numerous awards for academic success, they won none. You dedicated hours of your time to complete volunteer work, they did not. So who gets the job? They do, of course. But wait, how can that be? You were obviously the better candidate. So why wasn't the job given to you? The answer is simple, really--your competition had a trait that you didn't. Your competition could speak three languages while you were only able to speak one.

Athletic Determination Turned Crippling Stress by Casey McKenna

Athletic Determination Turned Crippling Stress by Casey McKenna

Casey McKenna

February 20, 2016


Filed under Opinion

Did you know that the average student athlete’s schedule consists of six hours of school, two-to-three hours of sports practice, and two or more hours of homework? Did you know that many student athletes take honors and AP classes while participating in sports on outside teams as well? This can add another two-to-three hours of practice to that already rigorous schedule. Did you know that some student-athletes also play instruments and participate in music-related clubs, adding to practice time both in and out of school? Did you know that severe sleep deprivation is typical of a student-athlete? For many of us, these facts are common knowledge. Speaking as a student-athlete myself, I felt it necessary to make these facts clear before continuing on.

Crossing The Poverty Line: A National Priority by Karthikeyan Mayilvahanan

Crossing The Poverty Line: A National Priority by Karthikeyan Mayilvahanan

Karthikeyan Mayilvahanan

February 20, 2016


Filed under Opinion

3.8 trillion dollars: the national budget. 711 billion dollars: the national defense budget. America has the highest military spending in the world. Its defense budget exceeds that of 13 countries combined. As if this isn’t enough, Congress wishes to another 600 billion dollars for national defense. So, is there any question why we can’t help impoverished families?

Efficient Spending Means Efficient Power by Kathleen Dugan

Efficient Spending Means Efficient Power by Kathleen Dugan

Kathleen Dugan

February 20, 2016


Filed under Opinion

Have you ever stopped to really think about how much electricity our school uses on a daily bases? If you haven’t, you’re not alone. I posed the same question to fifty students, from all different grades and backgrounds. A resounding 70 percent of my respondents said they never worried about it. As busy students, we oftentimes forget just how much of our school lives are powered by electricity. We take for granted our brightly lit hallways, our illuminated classrooms, and our fully charged tablets and computers. Our school relies on electricity in order to thrive, so wouldn’t it be great if Whitman could produce its own electricity by harnessing the power of the sun?

The Complicated Road to After School Busing by Deja Tejada

The Complicated Road to After School Busing by Deja Tejada

Deja Tejada

February 9, 2016


Filed under Opinion

Picture this. It’s 5 PM, and your practice just finished. It’s late. You’re exhausted. You want to go home. So you make your way to the bus platform to catch your bus. But there’s one problem. There is no bus. You know your parents aren’t out of work yet, and they’re half an hour away, anyway. So that is out of the question. The one friend you can ask for a ride is unavailable. The only option you’re left with is to walk home. You have to carry your school bag, clothes, shoes, equipment and gym bag. It’s already getting dark out. You’re cold and tired and have a 25-minute walk awaiting you. You don’t live in the safest neighborhood, but are left with no choice. So you take a chance. You brace yourself for the dangers and risks of the neighborhood and walk home.

Tenure Policies Create Apathetic Teachers by Hanna Fink

Tenure Policies Create Apathetic Teachers by Hanna Fink

Hanna Fink

February 9, 2016


Filed under Opinion

You’re sitting in a classroom, watching another video for the third time this week on something that you haven’t even learned yet. You’re now sitting at home, trying to teach yourself difficult material because you hardly learned anything in class. Now, you’re taking a test and thinking to yourself, I know nothing. You can well assume that your teacher is not worried about complaints because they won’t affect his or her job. You can already picture yourself being unprepared for next year’s course because of your unmotivated teacher. Does this situation sound familiar? I’m sure we’ve all had one or two teachers that popped into our mind. The thing is, what can we do about it?

Catastrophic Consequences of Common Core by James Reilly

Catastrophic Consequences of Common Core by James Reilly

James Reilly

February 9, 2016


Filed under Opinion

Allow me to remind you of a familiar experience to many in classrooms today: As the experienced, loved teacher greets his class, he is required to issue a special Common Core workbook. This workbook is filled with questions of a caliber that he and his colleagues, three PhDs and one master’s degree among them, could not fathom. Having to teach the content in this new curriculum is a burden on the teacher. Struggling to understand the content is death to the student.

Volunteer Work: Why It’s a Service to Yourself by Casey Leonick

Volunteer Work: Why It’s a Service to Yourself by Casey Leonick

Casey Leonick

February 8, 2016


Filed under Opinion

I don’t think any of us here need to be briefed on why or how community service is important. Volunteering is proven to have social, psychological, and cognitive benefits. And not just only for those who have actually done the volunteering. Through volunteering, students become engaged in the community and are given a chance to build a relationship with the population they are serving. Psychologically, community service is known to improve mood, reduce stress, and increase self-efficiency. When asked to explain the importance of community service, one honor-roll student said, “Volunteers learn that their work makes a difference and it makes them feel good.”

Is Common Core On Its Last Leg?

Is Common Core On Its Last Leg?

Tim Jobson, Lifestyle Writer

February 8, 2016


Filed under Opinion

Do you live in the world of Common Core? If so, then you probably understand the anger and frustration that comes with it. But why is it so bad? Well, the system is very new and unproven and, according to Governor Cuomo, “was supposed to ensure all of our children had the education they needed to be...

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The student news site of Walt Whitman High School in Huntington Station, NY.
Opinion